Emily Ratajkowski and her Son Sylvester Share a Cute Mother-Son Hat Moment

Emily Ratajkowski is a glowing mom to her baby boy Sylvester.

The model shared new snapshots with her infant son. In the pics, the star holds her baby boy as they pose in the courtyard of a classic NYC brick building. She wears a black fuzzy jacket, snakeskin pants, and white sneakers, while her son is dressed in a small red puffer jacket, blue and yellow pants, and a pair of baby Timberland boots.

In one pic, the mom-and-son duo are both all smiles as they pose for the camera in a stylish cheetah cap and an adorable purple and yellow beanie, respectively.

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A post shared by Emily Ratajkowski (@emrata)

The Gone Girl actor and her husband, actor-director Sebastian Bear-McClard welcomed their son, nicknamed Sly, last March. She announced his birth in an Instagram post including a sunlit breastfeeding pic.

“Sylvester Apollo Bear has joined us earth side,” she wrote alongside the post. “Sly arrived 3/8/21 on the most surreal, beautiful, and love-filled morning of my life.”

The soon-to-be author is releasing her first book next month, an essay collection titled My Body. In an early excerpt leaked by the Sunday Times, Ratajkowski reportedly writes about her experience filming the 2013 music video “Blurred Lines” with singer Robin Thicke, and claims that she was sexually assaulted.

In an Instagram Q&A, the star addressed the wider chapter containing the excerpt, also titled “Blurred Lines,” and explained why she chose to write about the experience, per BuzzFeed.

“I had a hard time writing that essay for a bunch of different reasons,” she wrote. “But ultimately I decided to include it in the book because my experience on the BL [Blurred Lines] set and how I talked about it says so much about the evolution of my beliefs and politics.”

“Most of my jobs at that point kinda sucked — I was either shooting e-commerce for online stores where I felt like nothing more than a mannequin or I’d be in lingerie while some middle-aged male photographers told me pout. BL was different,” she added.

“I was surrounded by women I liked and trusted,” she continued. “I had fun on set, being a sexy girl in a music video made me feel hot and cool and powerful. I told the world that the experience was empowering. In many ways it was.”

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