The four signs you should re-think a job offer

Revealed: The four signs you should re-think a new job offer – and how to turn the position down without burning any bridges

  • Career experts have suggested the reasons to rethink a job offer 
  • Sue Ellson said it’s vital to consider whether the job aligns with your goals 
  • The position should also align with your strengths, values and lifestyle 
  • She also shared how to politely decline an offer if necessary

Before accepting a new job offer, career experts have revealed the signs you should rethink the position – and how to politely decline the role if needed.

Sue Ellson, a self-described LinkedIn specialist and career advisor from Melbourne, said it’s critical to consider the offer prior to writing a written acceptance letter.

‘You need to assess every job offer, even if you applied for the role, with a range of criteria,’ Sue told Daily Mail Australia.

Before accepting a new job offer, career experts have revealed the signs you should rethink the position – and how to politely decline the role if needed (stock image) 

The role won’t help you reach your goals

Before accepting the new position, it’s essential to consider whether the role aligns with your values and goals.

As many job hunters often have clear career prospects, it’s important to ask yourself if the new position will allow you to achieve these targets.

The role doesn’t align with your strengths

Next, question whether the position aligns with your strengths and acquired skills.

Resident psychologist at recruitment company Seek, Sabina Read, said those who use their strengths at work are likely to be more productive and have a greater wellbeing.

‘When we use our strengths, work generally feels easier and more enjoyable,’ she said.

‘On the flip side, in a role where we can’t use our strengths we may procrastinate, feel bored and lose confidence.’  

The role doesn’t align with the context of your life

Other factors that may impact the decision-making process might include how the position would impact the context of your life.

This could include the location of the company and commute times, the benefits and if your lifestyle would need to change significantly. 

‘It’s natural to want to do the ‘right thing’ and accept an offer, but it’s okay to recognise that while it’s a compliment, not every role will be the best fit for you right now,’ Ms Read said. 

Other factors that may impact the decision-making process might include how the position would impact the context of your life

The offer was quick and unexpected

How to politely decline a job offer: 

Don’t procrastinate 

Keep it simple and to the point

Say ‘thank you’

Provide a reason but don’t get specific

Consider offering to stay in touch

Source: Indeed

Sue advised to be wary if the role was offered quickly after the interview process, as some companies often have a desire to ‘fill the position’ and rush potential employees into making a decision.

‘If it was an unexpected contact from a recruiter with a short deadline to make a decision, you must not rush your decision,’ she said.

‘It can be very flattering to be “head hunted” and particularly if it is for a similar role with a higher pay, but remember that the recruiter is not interested in your goals, they are interested in placing you and securing their fee.’

She also highlighted that all job offers do not need to be accepted. 

‘Just because you have received an offer, it does not mean you have to accept it,’ she said. 

‘You can politely say, “Thank you for the offer. Unfortunately it is not the right fit for me at this time and I wish you all the best in your search for the right candidate”. 

‘If you would like to maintain contact for a future offer, you could add, “If another opportunity within your enterprise in the area of X becomes available, please contact me again”.’

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