Brexit news live – Prince Charles says UK's bond with Germany will remain strong after Britain leaves EU

PRINCE Charles said today that the UK's bond with Germany will remain strong after Brexit.

Speaking at a Berlin ceremony marking Germany's national Day of Mourning, the Prince said that the two country's "essence" was down to the "connection" between its people.

It comes as the UK's chief Brexit negotiator said a trade deal with the EU may not succeed but that he is still hopeful of a resolution as the talks go down to the wire this week.

Follow our Brexit live blog for all the latest news and updates…

 

  • Niamh Cavanagh

    CONTINUED

    But there is scepticism in London of that target being hit.

    Ireland's foreign minister Simon Coveney warned there will be “real problems” if an agreement isn't found in time for next Thursday's video summit. And he urged Brussels negotiator Michel Barnier to “show some compromise to accommodate many British asks” in the last leg of the talks.

    But in return Mr Coveney said the UK would have to accept strong fair competition rules and a middle-ground solution on fishing. Boris Johnson stressed again today that there is a deal there to be done” and “we are keen to do it.”

    But an agreement “depends on our friends and partners understanding where we need to get to”, he added.

    “We need to be ready, whatever the outcome. This country is full of plans, full of resilience.”

    British negotiators said the remarks showed the EU still doesn't understand why we left the bloc.

  • Niamh Cavanagh

    RECAP – BREXTENSION

    Brexit talks will sail past this week's deadline for a deal as negotiators haggle over SIX HUNDRED pages of legal text.

    Trade negotiations with the European look set to go to the wire with both sides unwilling to budge on testy issues of red tape and fishing.

    Both sides privately admit this week’s target for a deal will be missed and talks will have to continue into next week and even beyond.

    But the EU had previously set a date for the end of this week for a breakthrough after Boris Johnson’s deadline demand of last month was also ignored.

    The delay risks legal hell on both sides as both the British and EU Parliaments must ratify any deal in a process that can take weeks – before it comes into force on the 1 January 2021.

    EU chiefs last night set No 10 a seven day deadline to clinch a deal before the bloc's leaders deliver their final verdict at a “crucial” gathering.

  • Niamh Cavanagh

    WHAT HAPPENS AFTER THE TRANSITION PERIOD?

    From January 1, 2021, the transition period will finish, which means new passport rules will apply.

    After the transition period, Brits may need an additional 15 months on their documents, which means you should double check whether you need a new passport before you travel.

    Previously, Brits who renewed their passport before it had expired could carry up to nine months over to their new passport – so a new passport could have the maximum validity of 10 years and nine months.

    However, these additional nine months will not be valid if heading to the EU, and with Brits also then needing an additional six months on passports to be able to travel, this results in an extra 15 months needed on the passport.

  • Niamh Cavanagh

    DO I NEED TO RENEW MY PASSPORT BEFORE I TRAVEL THIS YEAR?

    Brits do not have to renew their passport before travelling to Europe in 2020, as long as it remains in date.

    Brits are being urged to check their passports, however, with many expected to have expired during lockdown with renewals taking much longer than usual.

    Families should also not book any holidays if their passport is not in date, as the number on the document will be different.

    The current transition period runs until the end of the year, meaning British passports remain unaffected.

    Both burgundy and blue passports are valid for travel, as long as they are in date, so you will not have to change your burgundy passport.

  • Niamh Cavanagh

    A WEEK IN BREXIT – A LOOK BACK ON THE PAST WEEK'S EVENTS

    A Brexiteer and ex-reporter is tipped to become Boris Johnson’s new chief of staff, it's been revealed.

    Currently employed as the PM’s communications tsar, Lee Cain, 39, is said to be in “advanced discussions” about his promotion after the job was spurned by advisers.

    Loyal Cain had earlier served under Johnson’s aide Dominic Cummings in the 2016 Brexit “Vote Leave” campaign.

    The trusted adviser worked as a press officer for the Brexit push, before helping to run Johnson's leadership bid.

    His promotion is part of a shake-up of Johnson’s Downing Street operation, reports The Times.

    The paper says the PM's “decision to promote Lee Cain will entrench the influence of No 10’s Vote Leave faction in an apparent riposte to those urging him to reset his premiership”.

    More on the story here.

  • Niamh Cavanagh

    A WEEK IN BREXIT – A LOOK BACK ON THE PAST WEEK'S EVENTS

    Boris Johnson is on track for a Brexit defeat in the House of Lords TODAY over the controversial internal markets bill.

    Peers will vote on the legislation, which ministers have said breaks international law, by overriding critical clauses in the agreement already hashed out between the PM and the EU.

    The House of Lords is expected to vote this evening to scrap parts of the new Brexit laws, which seek to overwrite elements of the Withdrawal Agreement designed to avoid a hard border with Ireland.

    Earlier this year, Northern Ireland Secretary Brandon Lewis admitted the new rules break international law in a “very specific and limited way”.

    It means the UK would openly break the rules laid out in the Withdrawal Agreement inked last year.

    More on the story here.

  • Niamh Cavanagh

    TRADE DEAL 'MAY NOT SUCCEED' BEFORE YEAR END

    The U.K.s chief Brexit negotiator said Sunday before renewed talks that a trade deal with the European Union may not succeed, but he was still hopeful of a resolution.

    Arriving in Brussels, David Frost tweeted that there has been some progress in a positive direction in recent days.

    We also now largely have common draft treaty texts, though significant elements are of course not yet agreed, he said.

    We will work to build on these and get an overall agreement if we can. But we may not succeed.

    Britain left the EU on Jan. 31, but continues to follow the blocs economic rules until a transition period ends on Dec. 31.

    The two sides are trying to strike a new trade deal before then, but key sticking points such as fishing rights and competition rules haven't been resolved.

  • Niamh Cavanagh

    A WEEK IN BREXIT – A LOOK BACK ON THE PAST WEEK'S EVENTS

    Joe Biden is set to snub Boris Johnson by calling Emmanuel Macron, Angela Merkel and the Irish PM Micheál Martin before him.

    The PM will try to build bridges when he speaks to Mr Biden ahead of efforts to secure a post-Brexit trade deal between the US and the UK.

    And diplomatic sources said Mr Johnson was unlikely to be at the “top of the list” for a call from Mr Biden, according to the Daily Mail.

    The President-elect has previously described Mr Johnson as a “physical and emotional clone” of Donald Trump, and fears are mounting the special relationship between the US and the UK could break down. British diplomats expect the German Chancellor, Ms Merkel, and the French President, Mr Macron, will get priority of the PM in an effort to repair relations with the EU.

    Mr Biden, who has Irish roots and has been outspoken on the Good Friday Agreement, is also set to to call the Irish PM before Mr Johnson. One source said: “Look, we're probably not top of the list for the first phone call. Are some people in government fretting about that? Yes, but you can read too much into it. If we find ourselves being called after Papua New Guinea then we should probably start to worry.”

  • Niamh Cavanagh

    A WEEK IN BREXIT – A LOOK BACK ON THE PAST WEEK'S EVENTS

    A bagpiper who was apparently pushed over by a police officer in a stand-off near the Cenotaph has denied footage which shows him “bragging” about provoking cops.

    The confrontation happened on the outskirts of the Cenotaph in Whitehall, Central London after the Remembrance Sunday ceremony yesterday morning.

    Ben Buckland was arrested after he marched up to police lines as they blocked the war memorial due to strict coronavirus restrictions.

    Footage showed ex-Ukip candidate Buckland falling to the ground, sparking fury from a crowd.

    Buckland – who says he served in the Scots Guards – was later led away in handcuffs.

    He has since denied planning the stunt despite a video posted to the Immortal Aliens YouTube page suggesting otherwise.

    More on the story here.

  • Niamh Cavanagh

    DOM GONE

    Dominic Cummings 'applies himself in short bursts' and Boris Johnson needed to refresh his team, a government minister revealed today.

    Environment Secretary George Eustice said the Brexit referendum mastermind had “many great strengths” – but argued it was up to the Prime Minister over who would be his key advisers.

    The comments come after the Vote Leave campaigner was ousted from No10 this week amid claims of a 45-minute showdown with Mr Johnson.

    Speaking to Sky News today, Mr Eustice said: “I've known Dominic Cummings myself for many years.

    “He's got many great strengths and one of them is winning campaigns.

    “And he tends to apply himself in short bursts, short tours of duty, on big strategic changes such as the 2016 referendum result, such as the 2019 general election.

    “And he's very talented at that. But it's always the Prime Minister's prerogative who will be their key advisers.”

  • Niamh Cavanagh

    CONTINUED

    One said: “She’s having more and more influence in decision making, as the week has shown. She’s not content with being the power behind the throne, she wants to sit on it.

    “Carrie wants to be a new Princess Di character.

    She’s already got her own spin doctor and own team of people and seems to think she is the most important person in No 10.

    “It’s all about the court of Carrie. She’s not helping Boris at all. Everything she does is about her and not him.”

  • Niamh Cavanagh

    DOM WRONG

    Carrie Symonds was cruelly nicknamed Princess Nut Nut behind her back for months, it was claimed today.

    Boris Johnson's fiancée was referred so often to by the moniker that allies of Dominic Cummings reportedly even started using an emoji of a princess followed by peanuts instead of using her name in texts.

    Another nickname reportedly used for Ms Symonds by those in the Brexit lads group was “Cersei” – a reference to the controlling Game of Thrones character.

    And a senior No10 source today told the Telegraph the claims were “cowardly, vicious, and designed to wound her”.

    New No10 press chief Allegra Statton also slammed the “unpleasant” Vote Leave gang – saying she had even been left in tears by confrontations.

  • Niamh Cavanagh

    CONTINUED

    “One might equally submit that no country is really an island either, other than in the wholly literal sense.

    “Our histories bind us tightly together and our destinies, although each our own to forge, are interdependent to a considerable degree.

    “The United Kingdom has chosen a future outside the European Union, and the relationship between our countries is evolving once again.

    “Its shape is a matter negotiated between our governments and its essence is defined by the enduring connections between our people.

    “It is, therefore, my heartfelt belief that the fundamental bond between us will remain strong: we will always be friends, partners and allies.”

    The heir to the throne's speech was made as the UK's chief Brexit negotiator said a trade deal with the EU may not succeed, but he is still hopeful of a resolution as the talks go down to the wire this week.

  • Niamh Cavanagh

    'BOUND TOGETHER'

    Prince Charles today insisted “no country is an island” as he vowed Britain would remain close to Germany – days before Britain's unofficial deadline for a Brexit deal expires.

    The future king said the two countries had been “bound tightly together” – and their destinies would continue to be “interdependent”.

    n his address to the German lower house of parliament Bundestag, the 72-year-old admitted the UK's future was “evolving” but said his “heartfelt belief” the countries would continue to have a “fundamental bond”.

    His comments were his most direct reference to Britain's decision to leave the European Union (EU) to date.

    Speaking today, the royal said: “The English poet, John Donne, famously wrote that 'no man is an island entire of itself. Every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main.'

  • Patrick Knox

    ‘NEXT WEEK BREXIT TALKS MAKE OR BREAK’

    Ireland’s Foreign Minister Simon Coveney said both sides are entering “move week” – and it was now or never to get a deal.

    While Cabinet Minister George Eustice said time is “very short”, adding: “This needs to be a week where things move.” Crunch talks kick off again in Brussels this week, with both sides braced for clashes on fish and state aid rules.

    Boris Johnson has vowed not to sell-out Britain’s fishermen and is insisting half the fish in our waters are reserved for the UK.

    But stubborn Eurocrats are trying to force the PM to let the bloc plunder most of our fishing stocks.

    Mr Coveney told Sky News’ Sophy Ridge on Sunday said time is running out to get a deal.

  • Patrick Knox

    ‘WE KNOW IT’S UNLAWFUL’

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson's government has acknowledged that the Internal Market Bill breaches international law.

    But officials insist the bill is needed as an insurance policy, or legal safety net, to ensure smooth trade among all parts of the UK especially Northern Ireland, which shares a border with the EU no matter what happens to UK-EU trade after Brexit.

    Irish Foreign Minister Simon Coveney told Sky News that there is no way the EU will agree to ratify a new agreement if the British government is breaking the existing agreement that is not even 12 months old, and breaking international law by doing that.

    Britain's House of Lords voted by large margins on Monday to reject the bill, which has also drawn condemnation by the US President-elect Joe Biden, among others.

    A failure to strike a deal will hurt both sides, with businesses facing tariffs and other barriers to trade starting on January 1.

  • Patrick Knox

    CUMMINGS ‘TENDS TO APPLY HIMSELF IN SHORT BURSTS’

    Environment Secretary George Eustice told Sky News: “I've known Dominic Cummings myself for many years. He's got many great strengths and one of them is winning campaigns.

    “And he tends to apply himself in short bursts, short tours of duty, on big strategic changes such as the 2016 referendum result, such as the 2019 general election.

    “And he's very talented at that. But it's always the Prime Minister's prerogative who will be their key advisors.”

    Mr Eustice insisted talks with the EU on a future trade deal would not be affected by the departure.

    “The negotiations have been led by David Frost from the beginning. He's got a very talented, experienced team of technical experts around him.”

  • Patrick Knox

    CUMMINGS' DOWNING STREET EXIT PART OF AN 'EPISODE', SAYS MINISTER

    A Cabinet minister has branded events surrounding the dramatic departure from Downing Street of Boris Johnson's senior aide as “an episode” in the Prime Minister's time at Number 10.

    Environment Secretary George Eustice insisted the sudden exit of Dominic Cummings would also have no impact on crucial Brexit negotiations.

    Days of turmoil in Downing Street culminated in Cummings walking out carrying a cardboard box a day after Johnson's director of communications Lee Cain resigned.

    Mr Eustice told Times Radio: “It's also the case — and this is no secret — that when you're in more steady-state times and you need to build alliances, build relations with others, well that's less Dominic's forte and I think he would say that himself.

    “Dominic Cummings is a force of nature. He will do his own thing, I'm sure. But look, as far as we're concerned, there's obviously been an episode.

    “He's chosen to leave. I've no reason to suspect he'll be writing a blog.”

  • Patrick Knox

    BREXIT: TRADE DEAL 'MAY NOT SUCCEED' BEFORE YEAR END

    The UK's chief Brexit negotiator said today before renewed talks that a trade deal with the European Union may not succeed, but he was still hopeful of a resolution.

    Arriving in Brussels, David Frost tweeted that there has been some progress in a positive direction in recent days.

    He said: “We also now largely have common draft treaty texts, though significant elements are of course not yet agreed.

    “We will work to build on these and get an overall agreement if we can. But we may not succeed.”

  • Patrick Knox

    UK'S BOND WITH GERMANY WILL REMAIN STRONG AFTER BREXIT, SAYS CHARLES

    The Prince of Wales has delivered a passionate speech in praise of the bonds of friendship, culture and shared values he believes will endure between the UK and Germany in the aftermath of Brexit.

    Charles' comments, delivered during a Berlin ceremony marking Germany's National Day of Mourning, were his most direct reference to Britain's decision to leave the European Union (EU) to date.

    The heir to the throne's speech was made as the UK's chief Brexit negotiator said a trade deal with the EU may not succeed, but he is still hopeful of a resolution as the talks go down to the wire this week.

    Speaking in Germany's parliament or Bundestag, the prince said politicians and officials may be negotiating the “shape” of Britain and Germany's relationship but its “essence” was down to the “connection” between its people.

  • Patrick Knox

    PRINCE CHARLES IN GERMANY AS TIME RUNS OUT TO STRIKE TRADE DEAL

    The Prince has been attending remembrance ceremonies in Germany as part of Britain's diplomatic outreach to Europe's biggest economy days before a deadline to strike a post-Brexit deal with the European Union.

    The royal couple were received today by German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier and his wife, Elke Buedenbender, at Bellevue Palace.

    There is growing anxiety that Britain may find itself without favorable access to its biggest trading partner when a transition agreement with the EU expires at the end of the year.

    Steinmeier, who was Germany's foreign minister when Britain held a referendum on Brexit in 2016 before assuming the largely ceremonial role as head of state a year later, has in the past dismissed British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's efforts to renegotiate existing agreements with the EU.

  • Patrick Knox

    BREXIT STICKING POINT 3: HOW WILL THE COMPETITION RULES BE ENFORCED?

    To solve the problems, the EU is insisting that the deal hold some sort of emergency mechanism, that could swiftly inflict penalties if either side breaks the terms.

    A senior European diplomat warned: “Either the British accept and we then move on to difficult negotiations on fisheries, or they refuse, and we will then be out of time and the negotiations fail.”

  • Patrick Knox

    BREXIT STICKING POINT 2: EU FEARS OF UNFAIR COMPETITION

    The other obstacle is the lack of faith among the Europeans that once outside the EU single market Britain will play fair in terms of competition rules, even with a deal.

    Under the trade deal, will British companies enjoy easier rules on the environment or food safety only to sell their goods cheaply in the EU, where their rivals must abide by stricter measures?

    The EU is also worried about how Britain will subsidise companies. Too much taxpayer largesse could prove unfair towards firms in Europe, where state aid oversight is strict.

  • Patrick Knox

    BREXIT STICKING POINT 1: FISHING

    Fishing has been the least economically significant but most politically explosive issue, with Europe eager to keep open access to the UK's bountiful waters.

    Fishermen in France, Belgium, Denmark and the Netherlands have trawled British waters for centuries although they gained legal rights more than 40 years ago to share the UK fishing catch.

    But London wants access rethought to satisfy Britain's coastal communities, which voted strongly for Brexit.

    Belgian Greens MEP Philippe Lamberts said, on fishing, Europeans giving ground was “inevitable” but that any trade deal agreed now “won't be great”.

  • Patrick Knox

    POST-BREXIT TALKS ENTER CRUNCH WEEK WITH FAILURE LOOMING

    British and EU negotiators launched a desperate final stretch of trade talks Sunday, with both sides determined not to give ground, despite the looming threat of failure.

    Britain's David Frost returned to meet his EU counterpart Michel Barnier after a shake-up in Number 10 personnel left some wondering if London might soften its stance.

    But there was no sign of that in the message that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's envoy tweeted as he headed back to Brussels.

    “We are working to get a deal, but the only one that's possible is one that is compatible with our sovereignty and takes back control of our laws, our trade, and our waters,” Frost said.

    “That has been our consistent position from the start and I will not be changing it.”

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