Ghislaine Maxwell gets rare jail privilege — a face-to-face visit with lawyers

For all her complaining about her “onerous” life in federal lockup, Ghislaine Maxwell has scored a highly rare inmate privilege — an in-person jail visit from her lawyers.

She’s only the second inmate in Brooklyn’s Metropolitan Detention Center to get a face-to-face lawyer visit since the pandemic threw federal jails into lockdown in March, multiple sources told The Post.

Maxwell, who’s awaiting trial as the accused teen-procuring madam for Jeffrey Epstein, was visited on Friday morning at by two of her lawyers, according to Manhattan-based attorney Sean Hecker.

“Outrageous,” he said of the visit.

The appearance of special treatment for a well-heeled, well-connected socialite — President Trump himself last month had said,  “I wish her well, frankly” — sparked fury among the city’s federal attorney circles.

Hecker pointed out that Maxwell’s attorney visit came as she was detained at the lockup for only two months.

“There are defendants in capital cases who’ve been without the ability to meet with their counsel for up to six months,” he noted.

“There are inmates who will have trials in relatively short order … It’s inexplicable that you would grant one of the initial visits to someone who has been there for two months and whom the president has said he wishes her well.

“It feeds into the impression that there are two systems of justice in the country.”

Visits to federal inmates were banned entirely nationwide in March, when the coronavirus pandemic spurred a strict rules to prevent the spread of the virus.

The first attorney visit to an inmate in the Brooklyn lockup happened a day earlier, on Thursday, according to a source.

Social visits remain suspended, and all other entry into facilities — including legal visits — are tightly restricted under BOP guidelines.

Virtually none are happening, lawyers with clients at Brooklyn’s MDC complained Friday.

“Totally agree with @hekcer_sean and the Fed Defenders here,” former federal and Manhattan prosecutor Daniel R. Alonso tweeted.

“I’ll add that this is an unforced error by the @OfficialFBOP, which has an interest in being seen as fair and even-handed (in addition to actually being so.”

“I represent numerous federal inmates facing life in prison and since March have been unable to effect a personal visit,” longtime attorney Patrick Brackley told The Post.

“The rank-and-file lawyers who appear in federal court every day are shocked by this,” he said.

“For those of us who represent people without such resources, it’s unfair and reeks of favoritism to a wealthy defendant.”

The morning visit by attorney Christian R. Everdell and a second lawyer presumably providing a break from what she’s described in legal papers as “being treated worse than other similarly situated pretrial detainees.”

The British socialite had griped in the filing earlier this month that she is under 24/7 camera surveillance in solitary confinement.

Everdell and co-counsel would have needed to get pre-approval after affirming they have not traveled to a high-risk country or had close contact with anyone diagnosed with COVID-19 within the last 14 days.

They also needed to submit to a temperature check at the door.

“If approved for an in-person visit, the attorney will need to undergo screening using the same procedures as staff,” the Bureau of Prison guidelines state.

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