‘Give alcoholics ketamine to help break booze addiction’, says new study

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A new study suggests that alcoholics should be given the illegal party drug Ketamine to help break and ease them out of their addiction.

The controversial drug, Ketamine, a Class-B illegal narcotic in Britain called 'Special K' or 'Vitamin K' by clubbers – is often used as a horse tranquiliser.

However, researchers at the University of Exeter found people with severe alcohol dependence were able to stay off the booze for longer when they were treated with low doses of Ketamine combined with psychological therapy.

The study lead author Professor Celia Morgan, of the University of Exeter, said: "Alcoholism can destroy lives, and we urgently need new ways to help people cut down."

The professor added: "We found that controlled, low doses of Ketamine combined with psychological therapy can help people stay off alcohol for longer than placebo.

She added: "This is extremely encouraging, as we normally see three out of every four people returning to heavy drinking within six months of quitting alcohol, so this result represents a great improvement."

The Ketamine for reduction of Alcohol Relapse (KARE) trial was led by the University of Exeter and funded by the Medical Research Council.

The Ketamine for reduction of Alcohol Relapse (KARE) trial was led by the University of Exeter and funded by the Medical Research Council.

The second phase of the trial is the first of its kind to examine whether a low dose of Ketamine could help prevent people from quickly returning to heavy drinking after stopping when combined with therapy.

The team at the University of Exeter found that people who had Ketamine combined with therapy stayed completely sober for 162 of 180 days in the six-month follow-up period.

There are currently few effective treatments for severe alcoholism, which has a devastating impact on lives.

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