Met Office forecasts 26C Indian summer all week as drizzle clears

Brits will be blasted with wall-to-wall sunshine all week after a murky day today, weather forecasters claim.

Some parts of Britain could even soak up enough sun to hit 26C this weekend.

The Met Office indicates that tomorrow is set to be “dry with sunny spells”, with just the northern isles having a dose of drizzle.

It forecasted that the sunshine will last right through to Friday, which will be full of “warm sunny spells”.

Meanwhile, a Met Office weather map shows the whole British Isles basking in sunshine this Friday, with just the remote Shetland Islands receiving a smattering of rain.

Weather Outlook forecaster Brian Gaze said temperatures could even soar beyond the mid-20s.

He said: “26C is possible later in the coming week as a thrust of subtropical air brings Indian Summer-style conditions, with plenty of warm sunshine and beach weather for parts.”

The Met Office confirmed that 26C was a possibility this Saturday, as summer is given one last huzzah.

Met Office spokeswoman Nicky Moxey said there will be a “nice warm spell”.

"There's a warm front running east to west and temperatures will be rising as the week goes on with Saturday being the warmest day with many southern parts seeing temperatures around 25-26C,” she told Sun Online.

"High pressure is in charge all week except for the far northern parts of Scotland which will see some unsettled weather and the risk of rain and drizzle."

BBC Weather forecasts London to bake in a barbecue-worthy 24C on Saturday, with Birmingham and Manchester set for an unseasonably warm 23C.

Lucky Londoners will also be treated to 23C on Sunday, it added, while Birmingham is forecast to reach 20C and Manchester 21C.

Beyond this weekend, it is not clear if the weather will turn — so Brits are expected to flock to beaches while they can.

“There is a degree of uncertainty as we head towards the last weekend of September,” the Met Office warns.

“On balance we should see a north-west to south-east split in the weather with the strongest winds and heaviest spells of rainfall in the north-west, and the best of the dry, warm, and sunny weather in the south-east.”

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